Public Hearing on Kyrgyzstan's National Preventive Mechanism

Monday, November 30, 2009
KyrgyzstanKyrgyzstan's proposed future NPM came under examination on 30 November during a one-day public hearing in Bishkek. Draft legislation to establish the visiting body was discussed by around 70 participants, including the government, parliament and civil society. The event was co-sponsored by a range of organizations, including the APT, and was part of an ongoing dialogue to implement the OPCAT, which began in 2007. The draft NPM law was developed by a multi-agency working group over the course of 2009, in which there was great interest.

 

Date:
30 November 2009
Place:
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Purpose:
To ensure the establishment of an effective NPM in the Kyrgyz Republic.
Partners:

European Commission

German Embassy

OHCHR's Regional Representative Office in Central Asia

Ombudsperson's Office

Open Society Institute

UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Voice of Freedom NGO coalition   

Activities:
Kyrgyzstan’s proposed future NPM came under examination on 30 November during a one-day public hearing in Bishkek. Draft legislation to establish the visiting body was discussed by around 70 participants, including the government, parliament and civil society. The event was co-sponsored by a range of organizations, including the APT, and was part of an ongoing dialogue to implement the OPCAT, which began in 2007. The draft NPM law was developed by a multi-agency working group over the course of 2009, in which there was great interest.
Outcome:

Kyrgyzstan ratified the OPCAT on 29 December 2008 and in theory has until 28 January 2010 to establish or designate its NPM. Although there have been certain set-backs in taking this process forward in 2009, the November 2009 event was a timely moment to take stock of the progress made in this regard during the year.

Since the last seminar on this matter, which took place in Bishkek in April 2009, the aforementioned multi-agency working group simplified its vision of an NPM and created the corresponding draft legislation, which would anchor it in law. Prior to the latest seminar the APT and the University of Bristol’s Human Rights Implementation Centre gave their comments on it, which were largely incorporated into the version which was discussed on 30 November. Although many questions and comments arose during the public hearing, the participants appeared to be generally in favour of the working group’s vision of the country’s future NPM and the draft law underpinning it. 

Unique Aspects:
The overall process to discuss the Kyrgyz NPM represents best practice in that it has been genuinely open and inclusive. Regrettably, this has not been the case in other countries.
Next Steps:
The challenge for 2010 will be to have the draft NPM law approved by the Kyrgyz parliament and then to transform it into a functioning NPM. The APT will continue to liaise with its local partners as they strive to implement the instrument in practice.
Documents:
Agenda
Contact Person:
Matthew Pringle, APT Europe & Central Asia Programme Officer